A Proper Mac and Cheese

So, following the awful recipe that was the “Cauliflower Mac and Cheese”, we endeavored to find a recipe that would redeem Mac and Cheese once and for all. The Garlic X3 cookbook offered such a contender (Giatura made it once before, but this was my first chance to try it). So, without further ado, the recipe:

Macaroni and Cheese with Tomato Topping:

Serves 8

  • 1 lb pipette (originally called for elbow macaroni)
  • 1/2 cup bread crumbs (Colonna Italian Style)
  • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan
  • 2 tbsp fresh parsley, 1/2 tbsp dry (recipe called for 3 tbsp fresh) minced
  • 6 tbsp unsalted butter
  • 2/3 cup frozen, chopped onions (called for 1 medium onion)
  • 6 plump garlic cloves, pressed (called for 3)
  • 1 fresh red chile, seeded and minced
  • 3 tbsp bleached flour (calls for unbleached)
  • 3 cups 2%, lactose free milk, HEATED (calls for whole milk)
  • 3 cups mild cheddar cheese (called for sharp)
  • 1/2 cup low fat sour cream (calls for whole cup – DO NOT USE NO-FAT)
  • Kosher salt (a dash)
  • Ground pepper (a dash)
  • 1 tbsp fresh chives
  • 2 tsp fresh thyme/1 tsp dried (we used dried)
  • 2 large ripe tomatoes, cut in 1/4 inch slices

Giatura (Gia) started by liberally greasing the casserole dish with unsalted butter, while I began unwrapping and pressing the garlic.

a garlic press atop the pressed garlicThis is an awesome garlic press. The pressing surface is huge, so more of the garlic gets pressed each time. The silver tab on the far right enables the pressing surface to swing out for easy cleanup. Yay GoodCook garlic press!!! ❤ Gia

She preheated the oven to 375°, and put the water on for the pasta. The pasta should be cooked to al dente, or to two minutes before the time listed on the box. Next, Gia combined the breadcrumbs and Parm, while I cut what little fresh parsley we had. Thankfully we had enough to mix in the 2 tbsp necessary for the breadcrumb/parm mixture.

mixture of cheese and breadcrumbs in a bowl with spoonsThe breadcrumb, Parmesan, and parsley mixture.

Gia melted 2 of the 6 tbsp of butter (medium heat), and added the garlic, followed by the onions (she defrosted, drained, and dried them first). That got covered, and allowed to cook for 3 minutes on a low heat. She separated the solid pieces from the liquid – the solids were set aside, and the liquid was poured into the breadcrumbs.

Next she melted the remaining butter (same heat), while adding the flour. I whisked that in, and it was then that we discovered the milk was supposed to be hot… and needed to quickly heat it up in another pan. It didn’t ruin anything in the end, so no damage done. The mixture was supposed to boil for a moment (happened), then thicken after having the heat turned down. This never quite happened, so we eventually added the cheddar, sour cream (which was interesting to scrape out of the container), salt and pepper, followed by the onions/garlic from before. The recipe called for MORE salt to then be added with the pasta, and we promptly ignored that. This got liberally stirred together.

macaroni in cheese sauce, gooey cheese stuck to spoonYummy Gooey Goodness

The mixture just fit in the casserole dish, with enough room to add the breadcrumb mixture on top. It then went into the oven for 35 minutes, was allowed to cool for maybe 2, and then promptly enjoyed. Gia says: Om nom nom nom!

the final productFinally done! Om nom nom!

Advertisements

Impromptu Risotto-ish

Garlicturino86 (GT8) and I were hungry, so we decided to cook together. We took a look at the fridge and pantry and pulled out the items that were available for us to use. They were surprisingly limited: black beans, chicken broth (with vegetables and herbs), garlic, jasmine rice, pasta, a very small amount of frozen broccoli, fresh carrots, and milk.

“What can we possibly make with this?” I asked.

“Well, we can use the rice and chicken broth to make a sort of risotto,” GT8 replied.

I set to work peeling carrots and GT8 finely chopped 3 cloves of garlic. We heated 1.5 cups of chicken broth to a boil, then added 1 cup of jasmine rice and let it cook, covered, for about 15 minutes. I defrosted the broccoli and cut it into bite-sized pieces. Once GT8 had cut the carrots into bite-sized pieces we set them to boil as well, allowing them to cook for nearly as long as the rice. I also rinsed and drained a can of black beans.

Once the carrots were fairly soft and sweet, we drained them. We heated some olive oil in a frying pan, browned the garlic, then added the broccoli, followed a little while later by the carrots and the beans. By the time they were ready, GT8 had taken the rice off the heat and transferred it into a large bowl. I mixed in the beans and vegetables. The flavors all blended together marvelously, especially the rice and beans. This is definitely a meal we would both like to make again sometime.

I’ve committed a grievous offense against the Italian cooking gods. Perhaps it was eating home-made tomato sauce and meatballs with pasta while watching the Superbowl. Or perhaps it was not paying 100% attention while removing said sauce from the refrigerator today. Whatever offense I committed, I can ask only that I somehow manage not to commit it again. Because the penalty was far greater than giving 5 yards to the other team or making poor use of a time-out.

I dropped the plastic container with the leftover sauce and it shattered, causing the majority of its contents to splatter on the floor and in the refrigerator. I was in shock. I think if I hadn’t been so surprised by it I would have cried.

In The Callahan Chronicals, Spider Robinson explains an Irish belief that spilling or otherwise wasting alcohol is a mortal sin. When you die every drop of which you’re guilty is gathered in a container of some kind and you’re suspended upside down in it. “And if you die, to hell with ya!” It wouldn’t surprise me if Italians have a similar belief regarding tomato sauce (or gravy, the term preferred by some). If they do, my soul is in mortal peril. I spilled enough today that another mishap could cost me an eternity of eating macaroni and cheese that tastes like cauliflower.

So, it seems most wise to make some attempt at appeasing the Italian cooking gods, just to be on the safe side. Perhaps it is time I repent of my recent pasta-avoiding ways and eat more of it, preferably with garlic. Perhaps I must attempt my mom’s sauce recipe by myself (and blog about it, of course). Perhaps I must resist the temptation of cream cheese and jelly sandwiches and re-dedicate my efforts to advancing the culinary arts.

I pray that the Italian cooking gods will guide me in this quest. (Suggestions from readers are also more than welcome.)

%d bloggers like this: